Respite

I’ve been working on a book, a memoir, and that has pretty much absorbed my writing energy at this time.  Also, I recently had a discussion with a friend and fellow radical feminist activist who is also working on her memoir, and we concurred that it is important to step back from the world a bit while delving into one’s personal narratives of child sexual abuse and such.  Therefore, I haven’t been blogging much.  Obviously.  It’s been a few weeks.

Nevertheless, I keep coming across stuff that makes me think I should get this up on gray horse woman.

So I am just going to pop a couple of things up here for regular readers and stoppers-by to check out.  I’ll leave no commentary, although I’ve got oodles to say, and leave it up to you folks to chat about, if you like.  Truly, it would be lovely to hear from you, because it’s been mostly spammers and men looking for women being raped by horses who have been dropping by while I haven’t been actively writing.

First is this gem I grabbed from a chapter summary on Amazon.com from a book titled Taking Sides: Clashing Views in Gender.

Then there is this lovely extension of our porn culture:

College Sugar Daddy website

(Now, back to my book.)

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3 responses to “Respite

  • Rainbow Riot

    I’m in a strange no-womans-land of headspace right now, so I apologize if this comment is weird.

    I, too, am writing a memoir. It also includes narratives of child sexual abuse. I think that taking a break from the internet in general and blogging in particular can be necessary.

    On the transgender topic, I tend to side with other radical feminists. I make a distinction between FAAB women and male to female transsexuals/transgenders. I think that it is important to have FAAB-only spaces, online and in real life. Are they “real women”? I don’t care; just let me have a safe place away from anyone who has ever had a penis.

    • wohom

      What I find problematic here is not the debate about what it means to be “woman.” Such issues of gender and patriarchal culture have been central to radical feminist analysis from the get-go. (Although I have recently discovered there is much more diversity in the trans debate within radical feminism than what is revealed online in blogs; and most rad fem voices are not in the blogosphere.) What I find problematic in this chapter summary is that the authors use a person’s “sexual attraction to males” to determine whether that person is a “woman.”

      • wohom

        And, oh yes–good luck on your memoir! I find the writing process at times to be exciting and liberating; at other times, I feel rather nauseous. I look forward to seeing a post someday telling me where I can purchase a copy 🙂

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